Advocate for her daughter, Spring Township woman witnesses medical marijuana history

Advocate for her daughter, Spring Township woman witnesses medical marijuana history

PennLive.com: Daniel Zampogna | Gov. Tom Wolf signs medical marijuana legislation into law Sunday in the Capitol. Seated to his left is Dana Ulrich of Spring Township, whose daughter, Lorelei, suffers from epilepsy and chronic seizures and could benefit from medical marijuana. PennLive.com: Daniel Zampogna | Gov. Tom Wolf signs medical marijuana legislation into law Sunday in the Capitol. Seated to his left is Dana Ulrich of Spring Township, whose daughter, Lorelei, suffers from epilepsy and chronic seizures and could benefit from medical marijuana. PennLive.com: Daniel Zampogna | State Sen. Mike Folmer, a Lebanon County Republican, celebrates Sunday after medical marijuana legislation becomes law with the signature of Gov. Tom Wolf, right. PennLive.com: Daniel Zampogna | Gov. Tom Wolf signs medical marijuana legislation into law Sunday in the Capitol. Seated to his left is Dana Ulrich of Spring Township, whose daughter, Lorelei, suffers from epilepsy and chronic seizures and could benefit from medical marijuana. PennLive.com: Daniel Zampogna | Gov. Tom Wolf signs medical marijuana legislation into law Sunday in the Capitol. Seated to his left is Dana Ulrich of Spring Township, whose daughter, Lorelei, suffers from epilepsy and chronic seizures and could benefit from medical marijuana. PennLive.com: Daniel Zampogna | State Sen. Mike Folmer, a Lebanon County Republican, celebrates Sunday after medical marijuana legislation becomes law with the signature of Gov. Tom Wolf, right. Dana Ulrich: A Spring Township resident, she fought to get medical marijuana for her daughter’s seizures. She lobbied local lawmakers and even confronted then-Gov. Tom Corbett during a 2014 campaign appearance at a Dairy Queen in Berks County. Luke Schultz: A Bernville man, he has campaigned for medical marijuana because he has suffered from severe back pain for decades and believes it can help him. He was glad that so many advocates got to see their work pay off Sunday. Sen. Mike Fulmer: A Lebanon County Republican, he and Sen. Daylin Leach, a Montgomery County Democrat, sponsored the bill in the state Senate. Fulmer said parents of children with chronic conditions convinced him to support medical marijuana. Rep. Jim Cox: A Spring Township Republican, he sponsored the medical marijuana bill in the state House with Rep. Ed Gainey, an Allegheny County Democrat. Cox has said the legislation offers hope to parents and potential patients. Gov. Tom Wolf : A Democrat, he announced in January 2015 that he would support a medical marijuana bill. He said Sunday that he was proud to sign the bill into law. HARRISBURG – Hundreds of cheering supporters crowded inside the Capitol Rotunda to watch Gov. Tom Wolf sign into law a bill that makes medical marijuana legal in the state. Seated next to Wolf for the ceremony Sunday afternoon was Dana Ulrich of Spring Township.It was an emotional moment for the advocate whose daughter, Lorelei, 8, suffers from epilepsy and chronic seizures.It was also a surprising moment being seated next to the governor."It was really, really special," Ulrich, who for years has pushed for the legislation that she hopes will help alleviate some of her daughter’s discomfort, said of the day’s event.Backers of the legislation, who were carrying signs and wearing shirts declaring their support for medical marijuana, erupted with approval when Wolf asked whether he should make the bill official."It’s a great day for Pennsylvania but, more important, it is a great day for Pennsylvanians," the governor told the crowd.The law makes Pennsylvania the 24th state to allow the use of medical cannabis to treat certain medical conditions, including cancer, HIV/AIDs and multiple sclerosis.To qualify for medical cannabis, patients need to be certified by a doctor and have a medical condition that warrants its use.Regulation, transportation, growth and testing of medical marijuana will be monitored by the Health Department, officials said.It could take up to two years to get the regulations and distributors in place before medical marijuana can start being dispensed.Ulrich, speaking afterward, said that while Lorelei, who has an intellectual disability, doesn’t quite understand what the law means for her, the girl does comprehend that it’s a good moment."I think she can feel the joy we are all feeling," Ulrich said.Advocate Luke Schultz of Bernville also attended the signing ceremony.Schultz said he suffers from severe chronic back […]

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